Laura Oles presents Inside Photo Secrets for Authors, March 9 @ Sisters in Crime (Austin) – Free and Open to the Public

Laura Oles

Laura Oles

Inside Photo Secrets for Authors

Storytelling through photography has long been a powerful method of connecting people emotionally. For authors and writers, the use of photography can greatly assist in reaching and retaining readers. However, the digitization of photography has left the public largely confused about this new medium’s rules and regulations.

At Sisters in Crime – Austin’s March 9 meeting, member Laura Oles, a photo industry journalist and author of Digital Photography for Busy Women, will cover some current issues surrounding digital photography.

Topics to be covered will include:

  • Basic guidelines for using photos on your author blog & website
  • Creative Commons: What it is and why it matters
  • When you can and cannot use photos you find online
  • How to determine if a photo has been edited (for fictional story lines, etc)
  • What metadata is and what it tells you about the photo
  • How to use photography to strengthen your author page and blog posts
  • Tips for taking that perfect author headshot
  • Examples & resources for writers to find photos to use under license
  • General photography tips for powerful imagery
  • Why authors should use Pinterest & how to get started

Laura Oles was fortunate enough to have entered the digital photography industry long before Photoshop had become a verb. She is a founding team member of Pixel Magic Imaging, which was purchased by DNP Photo Imaging America in 2006, and has continued to advocate for digital solutions that improve the experience for shooters of all skill levels. She spent over ten years building and leading sales and marketing teams and understands the challenges of helping businesses establish a strong, unique presence in a crowded marketplace.

Laura has published over 200 articles in industry and consumer magazines and has been a columnist for Digital Camera Magazine, Memory Makers Magazine, Picture Business, PhotoInduced, ClubMom (now Cafe Mom) and others. Her book, Digital Photography for Busy Women, was named a photography category finalist in USA Book News.com’s ‘Best Books’ awards. In addition, she has served as an expert speaker for a variety of imaging conferences and conventions across the country. She continues to consult and write for the digital photo industry.

Sisters in Crime Heart of Texas Chapter (Austin) meets the second Sunday of each month at 2:00 p.m., at Recycled Reads, 5335 Burnet Road, Austin. Meetings are free and open to the public.

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More on This to Come

 

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Hypotenuse

What was I thinking? Obviously not much.

For a previous WordPress photo challenge (Object), I posted

Sisters in Crime Heart of Texas Chapter Book Swap, December 2013

Sisters in Crime Heart of Texas Chapter Book Swap, December 2013

I don’t know why. I’d already picked out several shots I liked better, such as

Shiner Beer truck parked at Valero gas station and convenience store, February 4, 2014

Shiner Beer truck parked at Valero gas station and convenience store, February 4, 2014

and

William's foot on my brand new Kindle, October 21, 2014

William putting his stamp of approval on my new Kindle, October 21, 2014

either of which is more interesting than books on chairs.

But at the last minute the books jumped out and said, Pick me! So I did. I was later appalled at how foolish the photo looked in comparison to those other bloggers posted.

On the other hand, considered as geometric shapes–two right triangles formed from a rectangle, their common hypotenuse composed of mysteries–the picture assumes a significance bordering on the semi-artistic.

Had I cropped more precisely, or had I posted before midnight, I might have observed that before now. But probably not.

You see, I didn’t discover the books formed a hypotenuse by studying the photograph. I saw it while composing this post. I wrote the word diagonal to describe the line of books, and suddenly saw triangles.

In other words, I didn’t know what I knew until I’d written it.

It sounds backward, especially to people who’ve been told they must outline before they write. Which is practically everyone who passed through an English class before the process theory taught by Donald Murray, Ken Macrorie, Peter Elbow, and other teachers was widely recognized. Writing as process allows students to use language to discover what they know and think before they try to organize.

(Ironically, most of those early outliners could have told their teachers that outlining with an empty head doesn’t work.)

Gertrude Stein at "Les Charwelles," ...

Gertrude Stein at “Les Charwelles,” June 12, 1934. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When Gertrude Stein says writers have the daily miracle, this must be what she means: allowing language to lead, using the hand to stimulate the mind, being surprised by your own creation, discovering yourself through words you’ve written.

Thinking with a pen, or a keyboard, in hand works for anyone willing to put words on paper or pixels on a monitor.

Results vary, of course.

Stephen King starts writing and ends up with The Shining.

I start writing and end up seeing triangles.

On this day, triangles are miracle enough.

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Love Poem for Valentine’s Day

I

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat:
They took some honey, and plenty of money
Wrapped up in a five-pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
“O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful Pussy you are,
You are,
You are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are!”

Edward_Lear_The_Owl_and_the_Pussy_Cat_1.jpg

Edward_Lear_The_Owl_and_the_Pussy_Cat_1.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

II
Pussy said to the Owl, “You elegant fowl,
How charmingly sweet you sing!
Oh! let us be married; too long we have tarried,
But what shall we do for a ring?”
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the bong-tree grows;
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood,
With a ring at the end of his nose,
His nose,
His nose,
With a ring at the end of his nose.
Edward_Lear_The_Owl_and_the_Pussy_Cat_2.jpg

Edward_Lear_The_Owl_and_the_Pussy_Cat_2.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

III
“Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling
Your ring?” Said the Piggy, “I will.”
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon;
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,
They danced by the light of the moon,
The moon,
The moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.
Edward_Lear_The_Owl_and_the_Pussy_Cat_3.jpg

Edward_Lear_The_Owl_and_the_Pussy_Cat_3.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

~ Edward Lear

***

Edward Lear

Edward Lear (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Sharing

Kathy Waller:

I’d planned to post today, but Daily Awareness has something more important to share.

Originally posted on Daily Awareness:

The Bright Field
by John O’Donohue

I have seen the light break through
to illuminate a small field
for a while and gone my way
and forgotten it. But that was the pearl
of great prize, the one field that had
the treasure in it. I realize now
that I must give all that I have
to possess it. Life is not hurrying

on to a receding future nor hankering after
an imagined past. It is the turning
aside like Moses to the miracle
of the lit bush. To a brightness
that seems as transitory as your youth
once, but is the eternity that awaits you.

Sunlit Poppy Field

View original

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Object

Sisters in Crime Heart of Texas Chapter Book Swap, December 2013

Sisters in Crime Heart of Texas Chapter Book Swap, December 2013

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The Soul Selects

For Maryellen ~

The Soul selects her own Society —
Then — shuts the Door —
To her divine Majority —
Present no more —

Unmoved — she notes the Chariots — pausing —
At her low Gate —
Unmoved — an Emperor be kneeling
Upon her Mat —

I’ve known her — from an ample nation —
Choose One —
Then — close the Valves of her attention —
Like Stone —

Emily Dickinson

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*****
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Book Not-Quite-Review: Terry Shames

Ellen Terry as Guinevere in the play King Arth...

Ellen Terry as Guinevere in the play King Arthur by J. Comyns Carr in the Lyceum Theatre production, designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones. American postcard (mailed January 12, 1895) based on a rotogravure to promote the US tour. The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Billy Rose Theatre Collection. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Back in my teaching days, I handed a student a copy of T. H. White’s The Once and Future King and told her I thought she might like it. She did. So much, in fact, that she volunteered to write a review for the school newspaper.

The review went something like this: I loved this book. It was just so…Guinevere was terrible. She was just so… It was so sad…It’s a wonderful book. I just love it.

Unfortunately, the review was never published, because instead of turning into ideas and thence into sentences and finding its way onto paper, it remained a clump of molecules of emotion lodged somewhere in the vicinity of the student’s corpus callosum. Only a few tiny bits escaped as babble.

The reason was no mystery: The writer was too close to her subject. She lacked distance, detachment. She needed, as Wordsworth said when defining poetry, to recollect her powerful emotion in tranquility.

Lack of detachment is a common condition. I’ve suffered from it for weeks.

IMG_2814Several days ago, I posted part of a paragraph from Terry Shames’ first novel, A Killing at Cotton Hill, and illustrated it with a photograph of four white-faced Herefords. That was all.

That’s still all. I’m too close to the book. I wouldn’t dare try to review it now.

If I did, it would come out like this:

I love this book. It’s just so…There’s this wonderful sentence on the second page about hovering cows…That’s exactly what cows do…I can just see those cows…The person who wrote that sentence knows cows…And the dialogue…It’s just so…I just love it.

As soon as I saw it, I fell in love with that cow sentence.* I’ve read well past page two, but I can’t erase hovering cows from my mind. So I’ll say no more about A Killing at Cotton Hill.

I can report that yesterday evening I attended a reading at BookPeople celebrating the release of Terry Shames’ second book, and the second Samuel Craddock mystery, The Last Death of Jack Harbin.

Terry spoke, read an excerpt from the book, and finished up by taking questions from the audience. To prevent the possibility that this part of the post turn into babble, I’ll simply list some of the notes I jotted down:

  • Terry is from Lake Jackson. She graduated from the University of Texas and then worked for the CIA. [KW: I have your attention now, right?]
  • Both of Terry’s books were finalists for the Killer Nashville Claymore Award.
  • The Last Death of Jack Harbin is about a veteran who comes home from war damaged in body and in spirit. The book is about what people do with their guilt.
  • Library Journal gave Jack Harbin a Starred Review. [KW: And they don't hand those out to every book that comes along.]
  • Scott Montgomery, BookPeople’s Crime Fiction Coordinator, says Jack Harbin “subtly works on you”–that you don’t realize its depth until you’ve finished–and you’ll still be thinking about it a week later.

Because of the hour, as well as my lack of detachment, this is as far as my not-quite-review will go. Suffice it to say that I enjoyed Terry’s reading, that I love A Killing at Cotton Hill,** and that The Last Death of Jack Harbin has gone to the top of my To Be Read list.

For more about Terry Shames and her books, read Terry’s “What’s Next for Samuel Craddock” and “MysteryPeople Q&A with Terry Shames,” both on the MysteryPeople blog.

_____

* The sentence isn’t really about cows. It’s about Samuel Craddock. But I am fond of white-faced Herefords, and the image Terry painted is so vivid, the cows overshadow the protagonist, at least in my mind.

** I forgot to take my camera to the reading, so I’ve illustrated with a photograph I took myself. The fur on the right of the book shouldn’t be there, but it was easier to just take the picture than to move the cat.

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WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Juxtaposition

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Ernest Davis

William Davis

William Davis

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Snow in South Austin: The View from the Door

To the right

1/24/2014

1/24/2014

To the left

IMG_2804 snow 2014

1/24/2014

The sidewalk

1/24/2014

1/24/2014

Footprints

1/24/2014

1/24/2014

The crack in the sidewalk

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1/24/2014

So much for the Polar Vortex.

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