Alien Resort: The Bride Was Lovely

King Benjamin of the Archipelago reported the marriage of Coy and Susan on the Alien Resort blog, but in a just-the-facts-ma’am account, lacking the detail readers expect in the Sunday Society rotogravure. Well, that is men for you. Fortunately, I paid attention to the matters of most importance and am pleased to supplement King Benjamin’s account. King Benjamin gave me permission to post this, although he noted it’s awfully fancy. ~ Queen Ramona


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Not Consuelo Vanderbilt’s wedding dress. See note at end of post.

Coy of Alien Resort and Susan of Alpha Pegasi exchanged marriage vows on Wednesday, July 15, 2020,  with Spaceship Captain Plucky officiating.

Social distancing was in effect at all times.

The bride was lovely in a floor-length gown of cream satin with a ten-foot train, fashioned after the dress worn by Consuelo Vanderbilt at her 1895 marriage to the 9th Duke of Marlborough. Her low-heeled slippers were of cream peau-de-soie.

Susan carried a tropical cascade bouquet of Asiatic lilies, ranunculus, and bright blue orchids. Around her neck she wore an antique pearl choker belonging to Queen Ramona, thus completing the tradition of old-new-borrowed-blue.

Ladies-in-waiting were attired less sumptuously but just as attractively in floor-length gowns of orange organza with ruffles at neckline and wrist.

The groom, best man Deadpan, and groomsman Dan Rosandich of Dans Cartoons wore black Vera Wang notch lapel tuxedos. The soles of the groom’s shoes were painted black so they wouldn’t look all dusty when he knelt.

Best man Deadpan carried the rings. Coy had considered having a juvenile ring bearer but dropped the idea when Susan reminded him that children, although cute, are unreliable.

Queen Ramona wore a rhinestone tiara and her Writers’ League of Texas sunglasses, the latter in hopes that no one would recognize her.

The altar was tastefully decorated with a lovely gift of flowers from bluejayblog.

Security was provided by Jett of Comically Quirky and Toby of the Adventures of Bitey Dog. All guests being of a peaceable nature, no biting occurred.

Following the wedding ceremony, guests partook of refreshments of brownies, mixed nuts, and pink champagne, with the option of plain pink punch for teetotalers.

 

Coy and Susan were especially honored by the presence of a Special Guest, the author of mydangblog, who came all the way from Canada to attend the reception.

Unfortunately, the bride and groom skipped the brownies and left for their honeymoon immediately after the service, and most of the guests followed throwing birdseed, so the crowd at the reception was rather sparse, and the guest author was stuck talking to Queen Ramona and an anonymous Truck Driver. The Queen and the Truck Driver enjoyed the conversation immensely, and the mydangblog author proved a really good sport.

When the festivities ended, King Benjamin announced that a good time had been had by all.

Queen Ramona surveyed the leftover brownies and begged guests to take as many as they could carry because there were at least 3,000 and the palace freezer wouldn’t hold them all. She said she’ll store the champagne in the wine cellar for future celebrations.

After a honeymoon of sightseeing at the main island of the archipelago, Coy and Susan are at home at their spaceship at Alien Resort.

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Coy and Susan extend thanks to all who celebrated with them. They’re especially grateful to Zoom for assistance with social distancing.

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Image of wedding rings by Arek Socha from Pixabay

Image of brownie by S. Hermann & F. Richter from Pixabay

Image of pink champagne by Jill Wellington from Pixabay

Image of the dress not belonging to Consuelo Vanderbilt comes from Flickr and is in the public domain. It is identified as American and dated 1894. It’s not so opulent as that worn by Miss Vanderbilt, no ten-foot train (or five-foot train, depending on the source) but it’s as close as I can get without possibly violating copyright or paying a licensing fee.

Many and varied dresses show up on the Internet identified as the Vanderbilt wedding gown. The one I believe is accurate, which  appeared in a magazine of the time, is available for use on the web for about $44.00. I’m not that desperate.

Reverted to Type

(The following was first posted on partner blogs
Ink-Stained Wretches and Austin Mystery Writers.
I wrote it, but, due to technical difficulties,
couldn’t reblog it here.
Had to post the whole shebang again.)

When I opened my personal blog, back in the Dark Ages, I titled it To Write Is to Write Is to Write. I intended to tell everything I know about writing.

Everything I knew filled roughly 2.5 posts.

Now I write about what I don’t know about writing and leave giving advice to those who know what they’re doing.

Reverting to my old librarian persona, I also write about blogs by writers who aren’t anywhere near running out of material. Here’s a short list.

Friday Fictioneers

Each Friday, Rochelle Wisoff-Fields invites readers to compose 100-word stories based on a photo prompt. Writers post stories on their own blogs and then link to an inLinkz list to share with other Fictioneers and with the public. It’s fun. Specific rules are found here.

Sammi Cox

Sammi Cox posts a weekend word prompt: The rules: “Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.” Participants are free to link their efforts in the comments.

Chris the Story Reading Ape

TSRA introduces readers to authors, gives authors a platform, and provides information for writers aspiring to be published.

—from Uninspired Writers“Writer’s Block? Relax! Do Something Else”

—from Jami Gold: “Tips for Creating the Right Impression of Our Characters”

—from Lucy Mitchell: “Why Some Stories Are Like Bridges to Other Stories” 

—from Anne R. Allen’s Blog  . . . with Ruth Harris: “Freewrite: How to Write About Traumatic Events Without Adding More Trauma” by Marlene Cullen

TSRA also promotes—and thank goodness, considering how much writers need it—”FUN and an OASIS OF CALM and Font of useful Knowledge andTips for Indies (please do NOT feed my naughty chimps or they may follow you home) from the woes and stresses of the real world”—such as,

“LOLs Courtesy of BlueBird.”

Kate Shrewsday

Kate was on a bit of a hiatus for a while but is back now with “Social Distancing for Dogs.” She’s posted a lot of dog stories—my favorites are about the dear (and sometimes smelly) Macaulay, the dog with the Neville Chamberlain mustache, including

“The Miasmatron: Or Never Feed Steak to a Dog”

“The Terrier’s Apprentice”

“The Day the Dog Did What He Was Told” [with video]

Rummage through her blog. You’ll find many more gems on many more subjects.

Hugh’s News and Views

Hugh posts about “this, that, and everything else,” but my favorite posts are the Blogging Tips, such as,

“7 Things To Lookout For Before Following A Blog”

“How to Use Excerpts to Get More Visitors to Read Your Blog”

and one treasure for WordPress users:

“How to Backup Your WordPress Blog to Prevent Losing All Its Contents”

A Pondering Mind

A Pondering Mind posts words of wisdom,

Old wisdom:

“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.” ~ Rene Descartes

New wisdom:

“We are all now connected by the Internet, like neurons in a giant brain.” ~ Stephen Hawking

And—again, thank goodness—amusing wisdom:

“Do you know how helpless you feel if you have a full cup of coffee in your hand and you start to sneeze?” ~ Jean Kerr

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I could go on—my first draft is twice as long as this one—but the deadline loomed hours ago. I hope you’ll check out some of these blogs. And I hope you enjoy them and return for more.

And—do you have any blogs you’d like to share? Including your own. Record them in a comment.

***

Image  of New York City Public Library lion by Chinem McCollum from Pixabay

Image of apes and books by Gerhard G. from Pixabay

Image of cowboy reading by mosla99 from Pixabay

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My blog’s original title, To Write Is to Write Is to Write, is a fragment of a quotation from Gertrude Stein, who knew how to write and who told Ernest Hemingway how to write.

The current title comes from the first chapter of Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. Mark Twain knew all about writing. Ernest Hemingway said so.