Shifting Responsibility, but Nicely

writing in the journal
writing in the journal (Photo credit: redcargurl)

Over the weekend, I had an epiphany.

If I’m going to write anything longer than a blog post–such as a novel–I have to do three things:

  1. Sleep–before midnight as well as after
  2. Eat–no refined carbohydrates, no grains, no sweeteners, no processed foods, no added salt…
  3. Exercise–as in MOVE. I didn’t buy that stationary bike just so Ernest would have a new chew toy.

And since it’s already 11:23 p.m., and I set a goal of an 11:30 p.m. computer shutdown, I don’t have time to write about the Stories from the Heart 2012 conference I attended over the weekend.

However, several other bloggers have written about it:

Linda Hoye at A Slice of Life Writing. Linda has just received the printed copy of her memoir, Two Hearts.

Pat Bean at Pat Bean’s Blog. A retired journalist, Pat spends several months out of the year on the road in her RV, blogging as she goes.

Amber Lea Starfire at Writing Through Life. Amber is a writer and teacher who focuses on telling lifestories through journaling, memoir, and art.

I hope you’ll check out what they have to say.

I would tell you more–both the blogs and the bloggers are much more interesting than my vanilla descriptions imply–but I’ve already run several minutes over my deadline, and I still have to add links.

After that, I head upstairs to work on Goal #1.

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Image by redcargurl via Flickr.

#ROW80 & a Star

A pleasing development: Story Circle Network has awarded a star to To write is to write is to write.

Story Circle Network is a nonprofit organization “dedicated to helping women share the stories of their lives and to raising public awareness of the importance of women’s personal histories.” It sponsors publications, workshops, writing contests, reading circles, writing circles, and other programs, many of them online. There are SCN chapters worldwide.


Membership is open to all women who have stories to share. No writing experience is necessary–just the desire to record life experience and to read about the experiences of others.

Over one hundred SCN members are bloggers. For a list and links, click here.

Review (again): A Broom of One’s Own

I wrote the following post two years ago to answer a “challenge.” I intended to post it at the end of September 2009. I got all tangled up in words and couldn’t write a thing. I intended to post it at the end of October. I still couldn’t write it. I think I managed to write it after the October deadline.

In the middle of the “process,” I considered posting the following review: “I like Nancy Peacock’s A Broom of One’s Own very very very very very much.”

But the challenge specified a four-sentence review, and I had hardly one, and I didn’t want to repeat it three times.

So there’s the background.

I must also add this disclaimer: I bought my copy of A Broom of One’s Own myself, with my own money. No one told, asked, or paid me to write this review. No one told, asked, or paid me to say I like the book. No one told, asked, or paid me to like it. No one offered me tickets to Rio or a week’s lodging in Venice, more’s the pity. I decided to read the book, to like it, and to write this review all by myself, at the invitation of Story Circle Book Review Challenge. Nobody paid them either. Amen.

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I like Nancy Peacock’s A Broom of One’s Own: Words About Writing, Housecleaning & Life so much that it’s taken me over two months and two missed deadlines to untangle my thoughts and write this four-sentence review, an irony Peacock, author of two critically acclaimed novels, would no doubt address were I in one of her writing classes.

She would probably tell me that there is no perfect writing life; that her job as a part-time house cleaner, begun when full-time writing wouldn’t pay the bills, afforded time, solitude, and the “foundation of regular work” she needed;  that engaging in physical labor allowed her unconscious mind to “kick into gear,” so she became not the writer but the “receiver” of her stories.

She’d probably say that writing is hard; that sitting at a desk doesn’t automatically bring brilliance; that writers have to work with what they have; that “if I don’t have the pages I hate I will never have the pages I love”; that there are a million “saner” things to do and a “million good reasons to quit” and that the only good reason to continue is, “This is what I want.”

So, having composed at least two dozen subordinated, coordinated, appositived, participial-phrase-stuffed first sentences and discarded them before completion; having practically memorized the text searching for the perfect quotation to end with; and having once again stayed awake into the night, racing another deadline well past the due date, I am completing this review—because I value Nancy Peacock’s advice; and because I love A Broom of One’s Own; and because I consider it the equal of Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird; and because I want other readers to know about it; and because this is what I want.

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Cross-posting again

Yes, I did it. I cross-posted.

I wrote “Try, Try Again” for Whiskertips. Then, because it was about writing, I posted it on write is to write is to write as well.

I didn’t even retype it. I copied and pasted.

To those kind people who read both blogs, I offer my apologies. To those who saw the two blogs with the same post title listed together on the SCN Blogging Circle page, I offer my confession of how foolish I felt when I saw that.

To everyone, I offer advance notice that in just a few minutes, I’m going to do it again.