Brazos Writers’ Women and Crime: The Lost Photos

Photos that should have appeared in yesterday’s post about the September 5th Brazos Writers’ Women and Crime workshop–didn’t. Somewhere in the endless loop of composing, editing, and previewing, they slipped away unnoticed. But they’re back now, the remains of a day well spent.

 

Brazos Writers’ Women and Crime: Facts, Projected Details, and a Streak of Luck

Just the Facts, Ma’am:

 Gale Albright and Kathy Waller spent a pleasant and productive day at  Brazos Writers’ Women and Crime workshop, held at the Southwood Community Center in College Station, Texas.

Speakers included

  • Mary Ringo, private investigator at Gumshoe Investigative Services, on Life as a PI;
  • Courtney Head, DNA Analyst at the Houston Forensic Science Center, on Life in the Houston Forensic Science Center; and
  • Lesley Hicks, Lieutenant, College Station Police Department, on Life in the PD.

A panel of authors–

discussed How to Create a Strong Female Detective, Professional or Amateur.

Over lunch, Mark Troy, author of The Splintered Paddle, hosted a Jeopardy! Style Game about Women and Crime. Players in the final round received copies of mysteries written by women.

At the end of the day, a reception was held during which guests mingled and authors signed books.

So much for the bare facts.

Presentations were excellent–imagine a surveillance operation that involves wading through sewage, hiding in tall grass, and feeding crackers to an enormous, foul-smelling dog who refuses to leave your side, while you’re trying to get pictures of people you wouldn’t want to meet in a dark alley–and details will appear in the near future.

Some will probably show up at Gale Albright’s Crime Ladies blog.

Gale might also tell how she wiped out the competition in the lunchtime Women and Crime game, and how she managed to snatch a door prize from the hands of the writer sitting next to her, whose ticket was only one digit off.

Said writer will tamp down her resentment and allow Gale to ride back home with her today. If I make her take a bus, she might not critique my story this week.

But I mean, really. Two prizes?

*****

Note: I fibbed. Gale deserved the game prize. She was a powerhouse.

*****

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AMW Workshop: Special Invitation for Procrastinators

Austin Mystery Writers spent Thursday making last-minute preparations for Anatomy of a Mystery, the free workshop it’s sponsoring today from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at BookPeople in Austin. I offer two photographs as proof. Some of the people in them are duplicated. (My assigned task was to cut up paper for the raffle. Mission accomplished.)

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This post, which is being typed around a large cream tabby who insists on operating the space bar, is directed to people like me–people who forget to register, to sign up, to RSVP. People who put things off.

Part of large cream tabby
Part of large cream tabby

The message is this: RSVPs are not required for Anatomy of a Mystery.

If you wake in the morning with an insatiable urge to attend a workshop about how to write the mystery novel, do not despair.

Come on down to BookPeople.

Authors Reavis Wortham, Janice Hamrick, and Karen MacInerney, all of whom have proved they know how to write–and have accepted for publication–multiple mystery novels, will share some of their secrets with other writers, aspiring writers, and readers.

It would be a shame to miss this opportunity just because you forgot to tell us you were planning to come.

It would be more of a shame to miss the great swag we’re handing out.  One example is pictured here. There are also some books and who-knows-what-else.

Swag
Swag

So take the advice of a veteran procrastinator: show up at Anatomy of a Mystery–and if you can’t stay all day, spend the morning or the afternoon with us.

And don’t worry about crowds. If the room is SRO, you can have my chair and I’ll sit on the floor.

Provided, that is, that you promise to help me get back up.

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