Doodle 2. The Crossword, Sort Of

Doodle 2. Doodle one of your favorite things to do. My favorite thing is to fly to Albany, rent a car, get a hotel room in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and spend several days driving up U.S. Route 7 to Burlington, Vermont, and down U.S. Route 7 to Lenox, Massachusetts (Edith Wharton's house), and up to Burlington, and down to … Continue reading Doodle 2. The Crossword, Sort Of

Doodle 1. Don’t Judge, Mrs. Pollock

Doodle 1. Doodle something abstract, using shapes and only one color. Words & Wine Wednesday at Austin's Writing Barn featured Carin Channing discussing her book 365 Days of Doodling: Discovering the Joys of Being Creative Every Day. Ms. Channing didn't know she was a doodler until she was forty, when she accepted an online 30-day Doodle Challenge. When the month was up, she … Continue reading Doodle 1. Don’t Judge, Mrs. Pollock

Keeping Austin, and the Universe, Weird

I’m at Writing Wranglers and Warriors today with a report on Alien Resort. Please read, and view, on.

Writing Wranglers and Warriors

MOW BOOK LAUNCH 003 (3)

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posted by Kathy Waller

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When I met him at a Saturday morning writing practice group at Austin’s Mother’s Cafe, I thought David Davis was a great writer of the impromptu essay.

David Davis at 2015 Fantastic Fest. © MKW David Davis at 2015 Fantastic Fest. © MKW

Give David ten minutes and he’ll create a masterpiece of eccentricity complete with–I don’t know how he does it–beginning, middle, and end. Thousand Island dressing, Monica Lewinsky, elephants that jump through burning hoops–his topics range from the ridiculous to the sublime and back again. When he reads his compositions aloud, people at nearby tables suspend forks and coffee cups in midair and stare at the group sitting at the table in the corner, shrieking with laughter.

Eighteen years later, David still amuses audiences, but he’s doing it in new ways.

Now David accompanies words with action. He makes short-short sci-fi videos and flings them out to the universe. And the universe answers.

rosewell street light img_1697His…

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I Lost My Kindle ….. Now what?

Losing a Kindle can be more expensive than just the replacement cost. Sharechair tells how to protect yourself.

sharechair

Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 11.15.35 AM Yes, I did. I lost it. The new one. The new, very expensive one. I have only had it a few weeks…… and yes, I’m so sad.

But this post is not about my stupidity or my angst (although I could rant about both!). This is to tell you about the experience I had with Amazon after losing the Kindle …..

My first thought (well, ALMOST my first thought, after a good hour or so of spouting un-repeatable words directed at myself and my carelessness) was to protect my account. After all, you can buy books directly from your Kindle by tapping on any book in the store. If someone had my Kindle, I worried that they could ring up some massive bills by downloading a boatload of books.

And so, once I could think rationally, again, I took several steps to protect myself. I hope you never…

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Guest Post: Terry Shames on Writing About Texas as a Lone Star Expat

Terry Shames, author of the Samuel Craddock mysteries, will teach at MysteryPeople’s free workshop today at BookPeople. Her books offer an authentic picture of life in small-town Texas. To read my favorite sentence from A Killing at Cotton Hill, see https://kathywaller1.com/2014/01/22/a-pitch-perfect-paragraph-for-readers-who-know-cows/ and https://kathywaller1.com/2014/01/28/book-not-quite-review-terry-shames/

As we continue on with essays by Texas crime fiction writers in celebration of Texas Mystery Writers Month, we turn to Terry Shames, who will be teaching at our free workshop coming up this Saturday, May 21st, from 9:30 AM – 4 PM. Here Terry discusses writing about her home state as a Lone Star expat.

  • Guest post from Terry Shames

James Joyce said of writing about Dublin, “if you wanted to succeed, you had to leave—especially if success meant writing about that place in a way it had not been written about before.” He writes about Dublin as a setting where he felt constrained by the essence of the place that was so much itself. I wouldn’t think of comparing myself as a writer to James Joyce, but I understand what he meant and I feel in a visceral way the truth of what he said in my writing about…

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Facebook, Serendipity, Alec Guinness, and a Cat

What is Facebook good for? After several years' pondering, I have the answer: Facebook is good for pictures of animals; and serendipity. I wrote about #1 in an earlier post. If I could remember the blogger who prompted the generalization, I would give him credit. Unfortunately, when I wrote that post, his name had already leaked … Continue reading Facebook, Serendipity, Alec Guinness, and a Cat

Color Me… Something

This blog was offline during April while I tampered with its appearance. I tried nearly every theme WordPress offers. I tried nearly every color WordPress offers. I understand that for blogs, white is in fashion, but I like color. I've played with the colors a lot. My main specifications: Background must be light enough for text to be easily … Continue reading Color Me… Something